Blog2022-06-01T20:48:04+00:00

Reptile Shows of New England Blog

Throw an unforgettable birthday party for the reptile lover in your life!

Make lasting memories with the help of New England Reptile Shows! Many young boys and girls are fascinated with reptiles and amphibians—creatures that don’t seem like your typical household pets. They’re exotic, and very different from animals that most kids usually get close enough to pet. So for the child who’s expressed interest in reptiles, New England Reptile Shows gives [...]

Calling All Boy Scouts!

Earn Your Reptile and Amphibian Study Merit Badge with the Help of New England Reptile Shows! If you haven’t yet earned your Reptile and Amphibian Study merit badge, read on. New England Reptile Shows will donate a snake or reptile that you can take care of for one month to help you earn this badge. To get your Reptile and [...]

When Your Iguana’s Tail Breaks Off, What You Need to Know

If your iguana’s tail has broken off, don’t be afraid. If you’re a new iguana owner, this can be pretty scary, all of a sudden seeing a twitching tail on the floor or in your hand. But this is a natural process called autotomy. Usually, an iguana will drop its tail as a defense mechanism, so the predator will be [...]

Green Iguanas|

Mating Habits in the Reptile World

What and How Snakes Do What They Do In honor of Valentine’s Day, it seems only fitting to look at mating in the reptile world, particularly among snakes. At New England Reptile Shows, we have a baby albino Burmese python, ball pythons, red tail boas, rainbow boas, hog nose and king snakes, rat snakes and more. Here we’re going to [...]

The Red Tail Boa, NOT for the faint of heart.

Red-tailed boa constrictors are from South and Central America, all the way from Brazil and Columbia to Mexico. These beautiful reptiles are non-venomous, and are very popular pets, but unless you are a professed herpaculturist, the Red Tail Boa is for professionals only. They can live for more than 30 years in captivity and reach lengths upwards of 10 feet! [...]

Red Tail Boas|

Why do snakes flick their tongues?

One of the most common asked questions about reptiles is: Why do snakes flick their tongues? All snakes, some lizards, and all cats have what’s called a jacobson’s organ on the roof of their mouth. A Jacobson organ is simply a hollow on the roof of a snake’s mouth that helps the snake to identify different scents.  Scents are actually [...]

Ball Pythons|
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